Tag Archives: 6-12 months

New Tastes-Infant

In addition to breast milk or baby formula, there are solid foods you can introduce to your baby’s diet at each stage of development. It’s most important to introduce a baby to new foods gradually, or one at a time, in case of food allergies.

In addition to breast milk or baby formula, there are the solid foods you can introduce to your baby’s diet at each stage of development. Single-grain fortified cereals give your baby iron, an important nutrient he needs now. A baby is born with a natural reserve of iron that begins to deplete around 6 months of age. 6 months is a good time to start.

Mix cereal with baby formula or breast milk, or water on occasion.

It’s most important to introduce a baby to new foods gradually, or one at a time, in case of food allergies. If not, a parent may have trouble tying an allergy to a specific new food. For example, if you give your baby three new foods over the course of a day and she develops an allergic reaction, you won’t know which of the foods provoked it.

You may want to wait until the baby is older to try some of these foods, especially peanuts. In fact, many experts suggest waiting until your child is 3 years before trying peanuts or honey. Ask your pediatrician questions about a food if you are unsure about it.

Telling Stories

The constant babbling is an important stage in language development. Baby is practicing the mouth movements he’ll need to produce real words one day, and build the brain cells needed to make the leap from thinking to talking.

Other parents warned you once your baby began babbling that she wouldn’t stop; and boy are you happy about that! Even though it’s nearly impossible to understand baby babble, it’s still fun to listen to. The constant babbling is an important stage in language development. Baby is practicing the mouth movements he’ll need to produce real words one day, and build the brain cells needed to make the leap from thinking to talking.

Now more than ever, she’ll be using her tongue, teeth, palate, and vocal cords to make all sorts of funny noises. Consider all that babbling as her telling you very important stories. While she sits in her high-chair babbling away, respond to her story with delight, nods of understanding and then repeat parts of her ‘story’ back to her. ‘You don’t say?! Ah-goo baa choo?’ Then tell her a little story of your own. Make sure you slow down your speech and pronounce every word clearly, because your little story teller will be listening and learning!